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Kay’s story: I go to all the best events

Kay Clow event first aid volunteer

One of the perks of being an event first aid volunteer is going to your favourite events – just ask horse-mad Kay Clow, who attends Burghley Horse Trials each year.

Every year, more than 200 Red Cross volunteers descend on Burghley in Lincolnshire to help out at one of the biggest equestrian events in the UK. The only guarantee is that it’ll never be quiet.

In 2013 the Red Cross treated 167 casualties with injuries ranging from cuts to wasp stings to dislocations. 

Dream assignment

Event first aid volunteers attend all kinds of events, including pop concerts, festivals and parades. But for Kay Clow, who has been hopping on to horses since she was a toddler, Burghley is the real highlight of the year.

She said: “I’m passionate about horses – I’ve been riding since the age of three – and love volunteering for the Red Cross, so being a first aider at Burghley is fantastic. You’re right in the heart of the action.

“This is my fourth year at the Trials, and as soon as it’s over, I’ll be putting my name down for the next one!”

Volunteer rewards

Like the rest of the event first aid team, Kay is trained to deal with everything from cuts and broken bones, to heart attacks and strokes. Having been a Red Cross volunteer for many years, she now couldn’t imagine living without it.

She said: “I love volunteering so much that I’ve even turned down paid work to make it to events. I enjoy the comradeship, meeting the public, and having a laugh with other volunteers and the friendly people from the organisations we work alongside. And of course, being able to help people is so rewarding.”

As well as Burghley, Kay also enjoys regular stints at the Silverstone Formula One in Northamptonshire, and was on duty in London during the Olympics and Paralympics.

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