accessibility & help

Prevention in action: resources for local decision makers

Sally Driver 87 with care worker Chris.

Too many people have to reach a crisis point before they receive the health and social care support they need.

That’s why we support the Care Act’s duties on councils to ensure that preventative services are available in their area and that access to these services is broadened.

We advocated strongly for prevention to be included in the Care Act and for it to be defined. We were successful, with three equally important forms of prevention being written into the statutory guidance. Read the triple definition of prevention in our report, Prevention in Action. 

Putting prevention in action

Now we want decision makers across health and social care to recognise that prevention is about more than just stopping something arising. It is about preventing, reducing and delaying needs and associated costs 

However, our research suggests that local authorities in England must do more to provide prevention services which do just that.

While prevention is present in local authorities’ strategies and plans, our report shows the term itself remains misunderstood. This is despite the Care Act’s attempt to provide a clear triple-definition of prevention.

Therefore, the Care Act’s vision for prevention is not being fully realised.

This lack of progress has its roots in a number of factors. Our report intends to help decision makers make the transition to better preventative care. It provides a national picture of local developments and highlights areas of good practice.

  • Read our report to see the extent to which prevention is being prioritised.

A step by step guide to tracking your preventative spend

We recognise that councils and other local decision makers have tough decisions to take about their local priorities and resource allocation.

To help councils manage and track their preventative spend, we worked with the LGiU, Mears and Camden Council to develop a toolkit. The toolkit can also be used by health and wellbeing boards, clinical commissioning groups, and other local statutory bodies.

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