Learn first aid for a child who has a nosebleed

1. Pinch the soft part of their nose and ask them to lean forward.

Pinching the nose helps the blood to clot. Leaning forward stops blood going into the airway or stomach.

Ask them to breathe through their mouth and to spit out any blood.

2. Continue to pinch the soft part of their nose for ten minutes.

3. Seek medical advice if the bleeding continues for more than half an hour.

Watch how to help a child who has a nosebleed (1 minute 19 seconds)

Common questions about first aid for a child who has a nosebleed

Should you tilt the child’s head back when they have a nosebleed?


Should I be worried if the child’s nose starts to bleed again soon after it has stopped?


What should I do if the child wants to blow their nose after a nosebleed?


 

Should you tilt the child’s head back when they have a nosebleed?

No. If you tilt the child’s head back, the blood can go into their airway or stomach, which may cause them to choke or feel sick.

Ask the child to tilt their head forward when they have a nosebleed.

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Should I be worried if the child’s nose starts to bleed again soon after it has stopped?

Not necessarily. The child’s nose may start to bleed again soon after stopping because they knocked, blew or picked their nose, or because the blood did not properly clot the first time.

If their nose starts to bleed again, pinch their nose and ask them to lean forward. After pinching their nose for another ten minutes, tell them to sit quietly to give the nose time to heal.

If the bleeding continues for more than 30 minutes, seek medical advice.

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What should I do if the child wants to blow their nose after a nosebleed?

Encourage them not to blow their nose – it may make it start bleeding again.

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Email us if you have any other questions about first aid for a child who has a nosebleed.