Learn first aid for someone who has a burn

1. Cool the burn under cold running water for at least ten minutes.

Cooling the burn will reduce pain, swelling and the risk of scarring. The faster and longer a burn is cooled with cold running water, the less the impact of the injury.

2. After the burn has been cooled, cover it with cling film or a clean plastic bag.

This helps prevent infection by keeping the area clean. Cling film or plastic won’t stick to the burn and will reduce pain by keeping air from the skin’s surface.

3. Call 999 if necessary.

If you can’t call 999, get someone else to do it. 

The burn may need urgent medical treatment. If you’re in any doubt, seek medical advice and always seek medical advice for a baby or child who has been burned.

Watch how to help someone who has a burn (1 minute 49 seconds)

Common questions about helping someone who has a burn

If clothes are stuck to the burn, should I try to remove them?


Why is cooling the burn important?


Should I cool the burn for ten minutes first or should I go straight to hospital?


Can I use a shower or cold bath to cool a burn?


What should I do if the burn is still painful after I have cooled it for ten minutes and covered it with cling film?


Should I put butter, cream or toothpaste on a burn?


Should I use ice to cool the burn?


How do I know when to go to hospital?


Why do I always have to seek medical advice if a baby or child has been burned?


Should I put a plaster over a burn to make sure it doesn't get infected?


 

If clothes are stuck to the burn, should I try to remove them?

No, don’t try to remove anything that is stuck to the burn as it may cause more damage.

You can remove clothing that is near the burn but not stuck to it.

Back to questions

 

Why is cooling the burn important?

Cooling the burn is important because it helps reduce pain and lowers the risk of long-term scarring.

Back to questions

 

Should I cool the burn for ten minutes first or should I go straight to hospital?

Cool the burn under cold running water immediately and for at least ten minutes.

If necessary, call 999 while you are cooling the burn. Continue to cool the burn until the ambulance arrives.

Back to questions

 

Can I use a shower or cold bath to cool a burn?

A shower is a good way of flooding the burn with cold water to help the cooling. Focus the water on the site of the burn rather than the whole limb or body. The water should be cold and at low pressure.

Avoid putting their whole body under a cold shower or in a cold bath as it could induce hypothermia.

Back to questions

 

What should I do if the burn is still painful after I have cooled it for ten minutes and covered it with cling film?

Burns will often be painful even after cooling them. You can give an appropriate dose of painkillers and reassure the person who has been burned to help them remain calm.

Always seek medical advice for a baby or child who has been burned.

Back to questions

 

Should I put butter, cream or toothpaste on a burn?

No. Butter, cream or toothpaste will not cool the area. Butter and cream contain oils. Oils retain heat, which is the opposite of what you’re trying to do. Toothpaste often contains menthol, which may give a superficial feeling of cooling, but does not effectively help a burn.

If you put anything on top of a burn and it later needs to be removed in hospital, it may cause further pain and damage.

Back to questions

 

Should I use ice to cool the burn?

No, ice could damage the skin.

Use cold water to cool the burn. If you don't have access to cold running water, pour other cold liquids such as milk, soft drinks or beer over the burn to cool it.

Back to questions

 

How do I know when to go to hospital?

If a baby or child has been burned, seek medical advice, making sure you cool their burn for at least 10 minutes first.

Seek immediate medical advice if an adult has burned their face or genital area, or if you are in any doubt about how severe the burn is.

Back to questions

 

Why do I always have to seek medical advice if a baby or child has been burned?

Burns can be very dangerous, depending on the age of the child and the size, depth and location of the injury. Even small burns can be potentially life-threatening to a baby or child, so always seek medical advice.

Back to questions

 

Should I put a plaster over a burn to make sure it doesn't get infected?

No, don’t use any adhesive bandages as they’ll stick to the skin and can cause further damage.

After cooling, cover the burn with cling film or a clean plastic bag to help prevent infection.

Back to questions

 

Email us if you have any other questions about first aid for someone who has a burn.