Keeping cool in a heatwave

Heatwaves advice

Get first aid advice and tips on keeping cool during the UK heatwave. 

The UK is experiencing a heatwave with expected temperatures of over 30C. 

Extreme heat can be dangerous. It particularly affects elderly people, babies and children, pregnant women, and those with chronic health conditions. 

People who live in urban areas and on the top floors of buildings can be especially vulnerable.

Find out how to keep cool, avoid dehydration and get first aid advice for heatstroke and heat exhaustion. 

Download our hot weather checklist

Heat exhaustion first aid

  • Heat exhaustion is not usually serious if you can cool down in 30 minutes.
  • It happens when someone has been in the sun or heat for a long time and loses too much fluid and salt from sweating.
  • Symptoms include loss of colour in skin tone, sweating, a headache, dizziness, and feeling sick. 
  • Help the person get to a cool place to rest.
  • Get them plenty of water to drink.
  • Isotonic sports drinks will help them replace salts lost through sweating. 

First aid for heat exhaustion

Heatstroke first aid

  • Heatstroke can be life-threatening if not treated quickly.
  • It is caused when someone becomes dangerously overheated. 
  • Symptoms include hot or flushed skin, a headache, dizziness, confusion, or being unresponsive. 
  • Call 999 immediately. Quickly move the person to a cool environment.
  • Remove outer clothing, loosely wrap them in damp clothes or sponge them with water. 

First aid for heatstroke

First aid for a child with heat exhaustion

  • They may have been in the sun or heat for a long time. 
  • Symptoms include sweating, loss of colour in skin tone, headache, dizziness and feeling sick. 
  • Help them to a cool place where they can rest. 
  • Give them plenty of water to drink. Isotonic sports drinks help replace salts lost through sweating. 

Heat exhaustion: First aid for a child

Safety advice for UK wildfires and drought

How to keep cool in a heatwave

Check weather warnings from the Met Office

Heatwaves and climate change